PGA of America Professionals Play 108 Holes at Paiute For Charity

Categories: Las Vegas Golf Pros News.

Las Vegas, Nevada (July 29, 2014)–There was a lot to be impressed about when Las Vegas Paiute Golf Resort General Manager Chad Gunier and head Golf Professional Tom Fischer played a combined 108 holes for charity recently. Both Gunier and Fischer are respected members of the PGA of America, and played a two-person scramble format during the marathon. Supporters pledged an amount for each birdie the duo made and they ended up recording 38 during their golf journey. All proceeds raised go to benefit the Junior Diabetes Research Fund (JDRF) and junior golf programs at the resort. –by Brian Hurlburt.

"It was fun! I've always tried to do something like this for charity," says Gunier, a Las Vegas native and active member of the community. "The JDRF holds a special place in my heart because my son was diagnosed with Type I Diabetes at the age of two. Anything I can do to help raise awareness and help such a great cause is always a plus. When we were out there, we weren't playing for ourselves as we normally might be. When Tom and I would go on a run of birdies, it was a great feeling to know that it was all going to some good causes."

The duo played all 54 holes of the resort in a scramble format. The three courses at the Las Vegas Paiute Golf Resort are The Wolf, Snow Mountain, and Sun Mountain. Each course was designed by World Golf Hall of Fame Architect Pete Dye.

The duo's efforts raised more than $3,000 to this point, but the total is still growing because more donations are being collected. If anyone is interested in donating now you can contact Ayeesha McKeany, director of marketing, at the resort at 702.658.1400.

The JDRF is the leading global organization funding type 1 diabetes (T1D) research. JDRF’s goal is to progressively remove the impact of T1D from people’s lives until we achieve a world without T1D. JDRF collaborates with a wide spectrum of partners and is the only organization with the scientific resources, regulatory influence, and a working plan to better treat, prevent, and eventually cure T1D.